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Found 112 results for the keyword ‘Moisture’

  • SHOULD I ADD VENTILATION TO A FLAT TOP OR BASIN TYPE ROOF?

    Be careful, we are still learning how to deal with these difficult structures after adding roof space insulation. The problem is that the air volume and its flat thin shape do not efficiently dry out the roof space as does the large vertical air space of a peaked roof.The cardinal rule is to ...
  • SHOULD THE ATTIC BE VENTILATED IN THE SUMMER?

    Yes. The attic absorbs a great deal of heat from the sun during the summer and becomes much hotter than the rest of the house. The better your attic is insulated, the less this heat build-up will affect the temperature of the house. Venting the attic replaces this heated attic air with air...
  • WHAT IS THE SOLUTION TO CONDENSATION PROBLEMS?

    In theory, that is very easy to answer. Condensation is caused when warm moist air either receives more moisture, or gets colder, or both. The solution is simple: stop the addition of moisture (by stopping the generation of moisture or venting off excess moisture), or raise the temperature...
  • WHY ARE MY WALLS WET?

    This generally indicates a lack of insulation behind the moist area. This can occur when loose-fill insulation has settled, leaving gaps. Open the wall and inspect the insulation.Corners are usually poorly insulated, and they lose more heat than flat walls anyway. If insulation cannot be up...
  • WHY DO I HAVE FROST IN THE ATTIC?

    Frost in the attic is no different than anywhere else. It is caused by warm moist air coming into contact with cold surfaces and dropping its moisture. The problem in attics is primarily one of quantity; in one house frost accumulations of up to fifteen hundred pounds were discovered one co...
  • HOW CAN I STOP CONDENSATION ON THE FLOOR HEADER BEHIND INSULATION?

    When fiberglass is pushed up into the space between the floor joists around the perimeter of the basement, condensation often builds up on the wood behind the fiberglass. This can be stopped by the addition of an air barrier -- as simple as Kraft paper or as complex as caulked polystyrene. In p...
  • WHAT IS DRY ROT?

    Dry rot is actually a fungal growth that destroys the cell structure of wood. In order to grow it requires moisture, oxygen, and warmth. Once started it will not grow in the winter, but it will survive and continue to grow during whatever periods of time provide its three necessary conditio...
  • MYTH: PARTIAL SEALING CAN CONCENTRATE PROBLEMS IN UNSEALED AREAS

    False. If you increased the sealing of the house and did nothing to ventilate or control moisture generation, humidity would build up and force more moisture through the unsealed cracks. But window condensation and air quality demands forces us to keep the humidity in the house to a constant co...
  • MYTH: VAPOUR BARRIERS ARE NECESSARY TO PROTECT THE WALLS FROM CONDENSATION.

    False. Vapour barriers do help to protect the walls from moisture accumulation, but the help they provide is almost insignificant compared to that provided by air barriers. Moisture gets into walls and attics by two paths: air exfiltration through cracks and vapour diffusion through the wa...
  • ARE BROWN PAPER-BACKED FIBERGLASS BATTS GOOD VAPOUR BARRIERS?

    No, but don't worry about it; they are no longer available in Canada anyway. It was impossible to seal the joints, which let through more moisture than the paper ever stopped. They were actually eliminated in Canada because their fire ratings required them to be covered with special materials. ...