for Cold Climate Housing and much more

Found 37 results for the keyword ‘Heat Loss’

  • Warming up a cold wall

    Rob in London Ontario has one wall that is cold in the baby's room and he just wants to warm it up a bit. The easiest way to make a significant difference without major renovations is to put about 1 to 1-1/2 inch of Styrofoam right over the painted wall and cover that with more drywall. That ma...
  • Heating Ducts in the Attic & Ice on the roof!

    Ray from Woodstock, Ontario writes:For 20 years we had no ice problems on the roof. Heating was radiant heating in the ceiling. Then we installed a forced air furnace. The contractor ran all the ducts through the attic and we have had terrible ice dams ever since. The contractor refused to...
  • INSULATION

    We can't stop heat from escaping from the house by conduction, but we can effectively slow it down with thermal insulation. In practical terms, just about the only insulating material we work with is dead air. All the fibers, foams, beads, and batts are just different ways to package dead a...
  • WHY ARE THE TEMPERATURES OF THE BASEMENT SO DIFFERENT FROM THE REST OF THE HOUSE?

    There are four special temperature considerations in the basement.The air temperature in the basement is not always the same as that in the rest of the house. In a house with exterior basement insulation, the massive foundation wall is warm and slows down temperature changes (hotter or colder...
  • WHAT FACTORS CAN MAKE BASEMENT PROBLEMS WORSE?

    Any of the following five factors can make matters worse:-- Thermally conductive soils: Dense soils that hold water fairly well, in contact with the basement wall are asking for trouble. Clay soils are even worse in that they allow migration upward of water through capillary action, the prim...
  • WHAT FACTORS CAN MAKE BETTER BASEMENTS?

    The three fundamental cures for basement problems are: removing the water from the outside, using granular back fill or a drainage layer against the foundation wall and insulating on the outside of the basement. Any one could stop or prevent a problem, all three of them together is the bes...
  • BASEMENT: FULL HEIGHT OR PARTIAL HEIGHT INSULATION?

    This is the most controversial question about basement insulation. Everyone, however, agrees on two points:-- Outside the wall, go as far down as you can afford to. -- Concrete block walls have large continuous air cavities that run the height of the wall. (The code now requires that this air ...
  • ATTICS

    Air leaks account for the greatest loss of heating dollars from Canadian homes. These are easily solved by sealing. The greatest conductive heat losses occur through the basement. Canadian basements typically lose more heat than ceilings because attics usually have a little insulation (eve...
  • DOORS

    Doors are large openings in the wall which fall somewhere between windows and walls as far as the heat losses go. You can lose as much heat through a door leading to an unheated garage or basement as you can through the front door.It is now common to buy insulated metal or fiberglass doors th...
  • CAN I INSULATE DOORS?

    You can either insulate the existing doors yourself or buy insulated doors.Often a door to an unheated garage or basement was never intended to keep the heat in. In addition to weather-stripping these doors, add insulation to the outside. Foam panels are the easiest way to do this, but they ...